Articles (Page 2)

ONFILM Interview: Sean Bobbitt, BSC

Published on website: March 25, 2014
Categories: ONFILM
Sean Bobbitt, BSC. Photo by Douglas Kirkland

“Cinema is really just a façade – light flickering on a screen. But because we invest it with ideas and emotions, it has the power to put images into our heads that will be there forever. Choices are based on instinct and immersion in the ideas of the script and director. I think film is better for the types of projects I work on. I prefer the way it looks, and I like what happens when you overexpose and underexpose it. It’s what I perceive as quality.”

Sean Bobbitt, BSC began his career as a news cameraman and documentary filmmaker. His narrative film credits include Wonderland, Hunger, Shame, The Place Beyond the Pines, and Oldboy. His work on 12 Years a Slave for director Steve McQueen received critical acclaim and recognition from many industry organizations. In 2012, he won the European Film Award for Best Cinematographer. He also earned an Emmy® nomination for cinematography for the TV mini-series Sense & Sensibility.

Film Lends Earthiness to KFC Spot

Published on website: March 21, 2014
Categories: VISION3 250D Color Negative Film 5207/7207
Scenes from the KFC spot. (Courtesy David Procter)

Since 2008, cinematographer David Procter and London directing duo Institute for Eyes — aka Luke Seomore and Jason Bull — have collaborated on numerous commercials and music videos, as well as several documentaries that earned plaudits including a Golden Frog nomination at the Camerimage International Festival of the Art of Cinematography in Poland.

The team’s documentary chops came in handy on their most recent assignment, a commercial for KFC, the fast food franchise. Procter calls it “a very different piece of advertising.” The goal was to lend the brand a more human, organic and earthy quality — and the cinematography of the spot was an important aspect of communicating those ideas to viewers.

Deshaies and Bonello Reunite for Saint Laurent

Photo by Carole Bétuel © Mandarin/Europacorp.

Saint Laurent chronicles 10 years in the life of designer Yves Saint Laurent, beginning at age 30. It sheds light on his genius, as well as on his darker side. Co-produced by EuropaCorp and Mandarin Cinéma, the film reunites cinematographer Josée Deshaies and writer-director Bertrand Bonello.

Deshaies, a native of Montreal, Canada, got her first job as a director of photography with Bonello, a French director, on Qui je suis in 1996. This led to collaborations between the two that would span more than 18 years and five critically acclaimed feature films including Something Organic, The Pornographer, On War, Tiresia, and House of Tolerance.

Creating Dreams for Arcade Fire’s “Afterlife”

Scenes from “Afterlife.” (Photo by Emily Kai Block.)

Cinematographer Evan Prosofsky and director Emily Kai Bock talked at length about dreams while in prep for Arcade Fire’s wildly popular music video “Afterlife.”

“We kind of resented the thought that dreams have to be sepia-toned and Gaussian-blurred,” says Prosofsky.

“Troubles” Avoided for Syfy’s Haven in Nova Scotia

A scene from Haven. (Photo: Michael Tompkins)

The Syfy series Haven, based on the Stephen King novella The Colorado Kid, takes viewers to the mythical town of Haven, Maine. There the series follows FBI agent Audrey Parker (Emily Rose), who arrives in town to follow a routine case but soon finds herself caught up in the town’s many mysteries. Audrey quickly discovers that Haven is a longtime refugee for people affected by a range of supernatural afflictions known as “Troubles,” and she herself has a surprising connection to the town.

The series, which just completed its fourth season, is shot entirely in Nova Scotia, Canada, in and around the town of Chester. When the decision was made to shoot in Nova Scotia, Executive Producer Shawn Piller (Stephen King’s Dead Zone, Greek) turned to cinematographer Eric Cayla, CSC, whom he had worked with on a previous series.