Television (Page 2)

Filmmakers Win Right to Choose Super 16 for Television

Published on website: November 26, 2013
Categories: 16mm , Industry , Television , The StoryBoard Blog

A recent campaign to reinstate Super 16mm film for broadcast in Europe has resulted in victory with all major UK broadcasters agreeing to accept programs originated on the format.

“This is an exciting resolution for filmmakers, who now have complete freedom to choose the right aesthetic format for telling their stories,” notes Andrew Evenski, president and GM of Kodak’s Entertainment & Commercial Films division. “Storytellers understand the power of 16mm film, and can take full advantage of the beauty, flexibility and budget-friendly benefits that this format offers.”

Film Rolls on Another Football Season

Published on website: September 05, 2013
Categories: 16mm , Matt Stoffel , Television , The StoryBoard Blog

With more than 45 seasons and more than 100 Emmy® awards under their belts, NFL Films rolls camera on a new season of touchdowns, goal-line stands, and all the other thrilling moments that entrance football fans.

16mm KODAK VISION3 Color Negative Film will be running through their cameras tonight for NFL Films' trademark cinematic shots that put you in the stadium and on the field. They will be shooting 32 and 48 frames per second, and when the game clock runs out the footage will be sent back to One Sabol Way in New Jersey for processing and review. For the seventeen weeks of the regular season and beyond, t

Doc Martin Gets the Super 16 Treatment

Behind the scenes on Doc Martin. (Photos by Rob Ebdon.)

The popular UK television dramedy Doc Martin is back for its sixth season. The show follows a doctor, played by Martin Clunes, who after developing a crippling fear of blood, retrains as a GP. He moves to a quirky seaside town, where he opens a practice and quickly offends the locals with his poor bedside manner.

Doc Martin is filmed on location in the village of Port Isaac in Cornwall, England, where “apparently the sun always shines,” jokes the show’s director of photography Simon Archer, BSC. The cinematographer, who took over for Chris Howard, BSC after season 3, uses a full range of 16mm stocks on the series.

INSIGHT: Rob Bowman 

Published on website: June 17, 2013
Categories: Television , Q and A
Rob Bowman. (Photo by Chuck Bowman)

Filmmaking is a family business for Rob Bowman. Taking a cue from his father Chuck—an Emmy-nominated writer, director, producer and television journalist—the younger Bowman got his start as a producer and director in the mid-1980s, working on such hit shows as The A-Team and Star Trek: The Next Generation. He solidified his reputation as a forward-thinking filmmaker when he earned his stripes as producer-director on The X-Files.

InCamera sat down with Bowman earlier this year as he was completing the 2012-2013 season of Castle. He talked about keeping up with the show’s lightning-fast pace and his penchant for Rocky Road ice cream.

Sun, Sand and Serenity on Reef Doctors

Underwater filming on Reef Doctors (photo Jasin Boland © Jonathan M Shiff Productions)

The advantage of working on Reef Doctors is getting to be in the sun, sand and serenity of Australian tropical paradises like the Gold Coast, Port Douglas and the Great Barrier Reef. So what's the catch? Sand, sun and serenity aren't always all they're cracked up to be.

Reef Doctors is produced by Jonathan M. Shiff and co-produced by Lisa McCune, who also stars in the drama series. The show is about the remote Hope Island Clinic on the Great Barrier Reef, run by Sam Stewart (McCune), an accomplished doctor who along with her team looks after the residents of all the neighboring islands, as well as the holidaymakers and thrill seekers who visit the area. Sam is also a single mother with a free spirit, and a determination for an unusual hobby: venom.