Next Generation (Page 2)

Clear Blue Finds Success on Festival Circuit

Published on website: June 25, 2012
Categories: VISION3 500T Color Negative Film 5219/7219 , Next Generation
Chris Sheffield as Simon in Clear Blue.(Photo by Katrina Marcinowski)

Clear Blue is an American Film Institute short film that tells the haunting story of Simon, who starts his first job at a community swimming pool. His morning shifts take an unexpected turn when he meets an old woman with a deep and dangerous secret. When Simon follows the old woman into the pool he makes a startling discovery. What follows is a tale of impossible love and its consequences.

The story was written and directed by Lindsay MacKay and photographed by Mattias Troelstrup. Other crucial members of the team were editor Rachael Katz and production designer Eun Kyung Nam. Clear Blue was produced by S. Brent Martin.

Brendan Barnes' Those of the Water wins 2011 35mm Film School Competition

Scene from Those of the Water

Brendan Barnes, from AFDA (South African School of Motion Picture Medium), is the winner of the 2011 Kodak Film School Cinematography Worldwide 35mm Competition.

Those of the Water, shot by Barnes, explores an ancient Xhosa belief of Abantu (The People of the Water) that come into question after a young boy washes up from the ocean.

2-perf Format Advantageous to Budget and Schedule

Published on website: May 25, 2012
Categories: 2-Perf , VISION3 500T Color Negative Film 5219/7219 , Next Generation
Taking a dolly shot on the panther, Director of Cinematography Sung-Kuk Lee follows a man (Kwan-Jae Ko) from the back to take a tracking shot. (Credit: Courtesy of Hyung-Suk Lee)

Director Hyung-Suk Lee and director of cinematography Sung-Kuk Lee shot the short film Two Boys and a Sheep with funds from the Korean Film Council’s Production Support Program for Independent Films. For several reasons, the filmmakers chose to use 2-perf KODAK VISION3 500T Color Negative Film 5219, making it the first Korean production in that format.

“The film is about two diametrically-opposed lifestyles, homosexuality and heterosexuality,” explains Sung-Kuk. “We wanted to portray these lifestyles with the dramatic space they deserve, and this would be almost impossible in a digital format. Only 35mm film accurately conveys the emotions of the characters, and allows audiences not merely to see or hear the movie, but also to experience it.

Young director uses film for music promo

David Wilson/Metronomy
David Wilson/Metronomy

David Wilson has recently directed a music promo for the band Metronomy. Unusually this was shot using 35mm film rather than digital. David explains his choice of shooting medium.

“For the whole of my career to date, I have used digital cameras,” says David “I come from a generation of directors who shot their first film on the RED camera and I’ve never really considered using film before. A couple of years back I won a ‘Sweet 16’ package in the Best Budget Video category in the UK Music Video Awards but I sat on this prize considering it to be rather special and also luxuriously expensive. When the Metronomy promo for ‘The Bay’ came up in May this year, I decided it was time to use the Sweet 16 package on this and I can honestly say it has taken it to the next level.”

Indoor has something everyone can agree on

Published on website: December 01, 2011
Categories: 35mm , Next Generation , KODAK 500T Color Negative Film 5230/7230
Indoor
A scene from Indoor

UK-based directing duo Si and Ad are just completing their longest short film to date. With a working title of Indoor, the film was shot on Kodak’s new high-quality, low-price film stock.

Directors Si and Ad have been working together for just over a decade. They started out as designers for record label, Virgin but quickly moved into the music video arena. Signed to Academy Films, they have produced a number of commercials, music videos and short films. Their previous short film, Post-It Love, was aimed squarely at the commercials market but also with an eye on long-form filmmaking. It garnered lots of attention and acclaim on the festival circuit bringing them more commercials work and the opportunity to make a longer short film.

Magazine

Archive

Stories by Film Stock

Connect