Focus On Film

Evan Prosofsky on the Early Days 

Published on website: November 25, 2014
Categories: Focus On Film , EASTMAN DOUBLE-X Black & White Negative Film 5222/7222

Paul McCartney’s newest music video, “Early Days,” may not be what you’d expect from the title – a nostalgic montage of The Beatles on American Bandstand or The Ed Sullivan Show. Rather, it is a throwback of sorts, a trip down memory lane of a different life, another musician’s experience. The video was directed by Vince Haycock and shot by Evan Prosofsky.

As one of the world’s most successful composers and performers of all time, McCartney wanted a video that reflected the nostalgia he had for an older time as an aspiring musician with John Lennon. Haycock took inspiration in that to create a film about what he calls, "the spirit and inspiration young musicians find in each other, set amid the Mississippi Delta blues, a time period that heavily inspired the Beatles."

Interstellar: Taking Film to the Edges of Space and Beyond

Published on website: November 07, 2014
Categories: Focus On Film , Large Format
Matthew McConaughey in INTERSTELLAR, from Paramount Pictures and Warner Brothers Pictures, in association with Legendary Pictures.

The science-fiction genre gets an infusion from Christopher Nolan with the release of Interstellar, an awe-inspiring tale of space exploration.Inspired by 2001: A Space Odyssey, the movie stars Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway and Jessica Chastain. It follows the human and scientific choices that contribute to the discovery of a wormhole that is used to surpass the limitations of human space travel and conquer the vast distances involved in an interstellar voyage.

Nolan and cinematographer Hoyte van Hoytema, FSF, NSC chose KODAK VISION3 film in 35mm anamorphic film and 65mm IMAX to capture the story. Nolan told the LA Times, “I’m a fan of any technological innovation, but for me, it’s going to have to exceed what came before -- and it hasn’t yet.” 

Michael Goi on Creating the Freak Show for American Horror Story 

(L-R) Jyoti Amge as Ma Petite, Naomi Grossman as Pepper. CR: Michele K. Short/FX

For the better part of a decade now, Ryan Murphy has been innovating the way audiences look at small screen entertainment. As the creator of shows like Popular, Nip/Tuck, Glee,and The New Normal, Murphy has established a distinctive brand of filmmaking that’s faster, louder, and more attention-grabbing than its television contemporaries, and one that puts compelling visuals on par with addictive storylines. Case in point: American Horror Story, Murphy’s television show/miniseries hybrid that plays more like a horror anthology with a new theme each season. In season one it was Murder House, which was followed by Asylum and Coven. And this fall, Freak Show premiered with what Murphy describes as “the most terrifying clown of all time.”

Michael Goi, ASC, ISC has been there since nearly the beginning, shooting the second half of American Horror Story’s first season after first collaborating with Murphy on Glee. “American Horror Story had a visual style and approach for season one that was already established by the time I came on to it,” says Goi. “I didn’t make a lot of alterations to it, but in the last two or three episodes I started to veer in the direction that I felt like the material was taking me, and some of that approach is what’s reflected in season two, Asylum, where you’re dealing with an atmosphere that was very crazed. And I think the camerawork and the lighting reflected that a lot.”

St. Vincent Calls for a Human Look

JAEDEN LIEBERHER and BILL MURRAY star in ST. VINCENT© 2014 The Weinstein Company. All Rights Reserved. / Photo: Atsushi Nishijima

Among his many iconic credits as a cinematographer, John Lindley, ASC counts memorable films like Father of the Bride, Mr. Brooks, Pleasantville, You’ve Got Mail, Sleeping with the Enemy, and Field of Dreams in his repertoire. His most recent endeavor is St. Vincent, in which Bill Murray plays a gone-to-seed war veteran who has an influence on a young boy who lives next door. That influence is unwelcome to the boy’s recently divorced parents.

There’s comedy in that conflict, and eventually, an unlikely friendship develops. The cast also includes Melissa McCarthy.

The Look of Fear

Published on website: October 20, 2014
Categories: Focus On Film , The StoryBoard Blog
Walkers - The Walking Dead Season 5, Episode 1 - Photo: Gene Page © AMC Film Holdings LLC.

We’re entering that haunted time of year, and trust us, it’s spooky out there. Both on television and in theaters, productions are being sharpened to shock and unsettle viewers. As part of their horror formula, American Horror Story, Dracula Untold, and The Walking Deadall use film to get the mood just right.

“On our show, we focus on the quality of the look,” says Tom Luse, producer of The Walking Dead. “We can shoot a zombie in bright daylight on film and it looks amazing. We also find that shooting 16mm is extremely quick. We have the flexibility to move our cameras and adjust very quickly under extreme situations in terms of heat, humidity and pretty hard physical situations.”