VISION3 50D Color Negative Film 5203/7203 (Page 2)

Kaminski Chooses Kodak for The Judge

Robert Downey Jr. and Robert Duvall in "The Judge" a Warner Bros. Pictures release. Photo by Claire Folger. Copyright: © 2013 WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Janusz Kaminski is a two-time OSCAR® winner who is best known for his many collaborations with Steven Spielberg, including Schindler’s List, Saving Private Ryan, Minority Report, Catch Me If You Can, Munich, War Horse and Lincoln. Kaminski’s credits also include such memorable films as The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, Jerry Maguire and How Do You Know.

When Kaminski chooses a project to shoot outside of his collaboration with Spielberg, he is selective. Recently, he brought his keen eye and gift for visual storytelling to The Judge, a feature film for director David Dobkin. The film opened the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival.

Difret: Ethiopian Story Earns Praise at Sundance, Berlin

Tizita Hagere Photo by Zeresenay Berhane Mehari

On and off for eight years, director Zeresenay Mehari worked to make Difret, his narrative feature debut, a reality. A graduate of University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts, Mehari’s script depicted a bright, 14-year-old girl who is abducted into marriage, an ancient tradition that is not uncommon in Mehari’s native land of Ethiopia. In the story, the girl fights against this injustice, shooting her would-be husband in the struggle. A tenacious lawyer from the city defends the girl, who is caught between the civil laws and old traditions. After a couple of false starts, he found financing for the film. Angelina Jolie is among the executive producers.

Mehari connected with cinematographer Monika Lenczewska, a graduate of the American Film Institute whose credits include multiple lauded short films, numerous commercials, and the feature films B for Boy and Imperial Dreams. Lenczewska was impressed with the script, and when Mehari mentioned he wanted to shoot on 2-perf 35mm film, she officially signed on.

Ask a Filmmaker: David Dart, NFL Films - Answers

Ask_A_Filmmaker-Dave_Dart-NFL.jpg
David Dart, NFL Films staff cinematographer

The questions are in and the answers are back! A big Thank You to NFL Films cinematographer Dave Dart for taking the time during playoffs to answer questions from our readers! You all came up with some great ones with topics including focus pulling, film stock preference, shooting style, and the romanticism of football on film.

There's a reason NFL Films has won over 100 Emmy® awards, and here's a sneak peak at how they do it!

HBO’s True Detective Elevates the Television Drama

Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey.(Photos courtesy HBO/James Bridges.)

HBO continues its run of cinematic originals in 2014 with the eight-episode series True Detective. Written by acclaimed novelist Nic Pizzolatto and set in southern Louisiana, the series stars Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson as two detectives thrust together in a 17-year search for a serial killer.

Cary Fukunaga directs with Australian cinematographer Adam Arkapaw guiding the visuals. Arkapaw, with the features Lore, The Snowtown Murders and Animal Kingdom under his belt, recently garnered an EMMY® Award for his work on the 2013 series Top of the Lake.

Abby for Apples is Homegrown in New York State

Published on website: November 18, 2013
Categories: 16mm , Commercials , Focus On Film , VISION3 50D Color Negative Film 5203/7203
Abby Wambach stars in “Abby for Apples.”

Soccer star Abby Wambach was “homegrown in New York State, just like New York apples,” exactly what the New York Apple Association was looking for when choosing a spokesperson. Wambach, the greatest goal scorer in international soccer history, is currently leading a multi-platform campaign for the trade association that includes commercials, radio spots, print ads, and point-of-purchase displays. The 30-second television spot, “Abby for Apples,” is headlining the campaign.

The commercial features Wambach and a group of children enjoying apples and soccer in an orchard located in Upstate New York. When director Ray Manard took on the project, he knew very early on that he wanted to use film for the spot. “The shoot was all outside, so weather was obviously going to be an unpredictable factor,” explains Manard. “Based on the schedule, we knew there would definitely be some high-contrast sun situations to deal with, and film, absolutely, would be able to handle that, the way only film can.”

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