VISION3 250D Color Negative Film 5207/7207

Exploring Pan's Labyrinth with Guillermo Navarro

Published on website: September 30, 2015
Categories: VISION3 250D Color Negative Film 5207/7207
Actor Ivana Baquero in a scene from "Pan's Labyrinth," shot by cinematographer Guillermo Navarro, ASC, AMC. Photo by TERESA ISASI. © 2006 Picturehouse.

Pan’s Labyrinth takes the audience on a journey with an 11-year-old girl who travels between the grim realities of a brutal civil war in Spain and an alternate fairytale universe. As the story evolves, the boundary between reality and the warm dreamworld becomes hazy. The audience discovers through the eyes of the girl that there are good and evil beings, and moral choices to make in both worlds.

The film is the fourth of five collaborations for Guillermo del Toro and Guillermo Navarro, ASC, AMC, dating back to Cronos in 1993. The concept and script are products of del Toro’s fertile imagination. He directed the Spanish language (with English subtitles) film and collaborated with Navarro in the creation of a unique visual language. The cinematographer then rendered images onto film like an artist dabbing paint on a canvas.

16mm Provides Right Aesthetic for Charles Poekel’s Indie Feature Debut

Kentucker Audley in "Christmas, Again". (Credit: Sean Price Williams.)

Christmas, Again is the first feature film from writer-director Charles Poekel. It follows a heartbroken man, played by Kentucker Audley, in the month leading up to Christmas as he sells trees on the street in Brooklyn, New York. The intimate story was shot by Sean Price Williams, whose previous credits include the indie gem Listen Up Philip.  

Christmas, Again premiered earlier this year at the Sundance Film Festival in the low-budget NEXT category.

Super 8 Lends a Lo-Fi Aesthetic to Dim the Lights

Dwight Chalmers filming on Route 66. (credit: Angela Carpenter)

Dwight Chalmers is filmmaker and musician who divides his time between professional sound work for movies and television, and small, personal films. His most recent short film is Dim the Lights, an impressionistic collage that serves as a travelogue for a recent trip from the Midwest to the Pacific Ocean along the old Route 66. The film’s audio track includes original music along with sounds and ambiences gathered and edited by Chalmers.

“At first, there were two sides to my love for sound,” says Chalmers. “One was recording bands, and the other was collecting ambiences. For years, I have gone out and recorded interesting sounds – crickets, open air spaces, air conditioners, a soda machine with a strange buzz. Twenty years later, I might use sounds from that library on a project like Dim the Lights.”

Super 16 Delivers Cinematic Imagery for Umrika 

Scenes from Umrika. (Photos by Petra Korner)

Cinematographer Petra Korner’s latest feature, Umrika, starts out in a small mountain village in India in the mid-1970s. When Ramakant, a young boy from the village who discovers that his brother – long believed to be in America – has actually gone missing, he begins to invent letters on his behalf to save their mother from heartbreak, while setting out on a journey to find him.

The script has humorous and dramatic aspects, but Korner and director Prashant Nair agreed that it should be photographed with a classic dramatic approach.

Super 16 Grit Seizes Look of Hostage Drama

Joe Anderson portrays Garrett Tully. (Photo by Rodney Taylor, ASC.)

When Rodney Taylor read the script for Supremacy, he saw a story that could benefit from Super 16 origination and a gritty, handheld aesthetic. The cinematographer mentioned Black Swan, The Hurt Locker and a couple of other recent Super 16 films in his first meeting with Deon Taylor, the basketball player-turned-director. He immediately liked the idea, even though the film had been budgeted for digital video.

Supremacy is the hard-hitting story of a white supremacist, recently paroled, who takes an African-American family hostage. The filmmakers found some Gordon Parks documentary photographs that had an edgy, dimly lit mood with an ominous hint of violence, and used them as a starting point for developing a look for the film.