EASTMAN DOUBLE-X Black & White Negative Film 5222/7222

Evan Prosofsky on the Early Days 

Published on website: November 25, 2014
Categories: Focus On Film , EASTMAN DOUBLE-X Black & White Negative Film 5222/7222

Paul McCartney’s newest music video, “Early Days,” may not be what you’d expect from the title – a nostalgic montage of The Beatles on American Bandstand or The Ed Sullivan Show. Rather, it is a throwback of sorts, a trip down memory lane of a different life, another musician’s experience. The video was directed by Vince Haycock and shot by Evan Prosofsky.

As one of the world’s most successful composers and performers of all time, McCartney wanted a video that reflected the nostalgia he had for an older time as an aspiring musician with John Lennon. Haycock took inspiration in that to create a film about what he calls, "the spirit and inspiration young musicians find in each other, set amid the Mississippi Delta blues, a time period that heavily inspired the Beatles."

Michael Goi on Creating the Freak Show for American Horror Story 

(L-R) Jyoti Amge as Ma Petite, Naomi Grossman as Pepper. CR: Michele K. Short/FX

For the better part of a decade now, Ryan Murphy has been innovating the way audiences look at small screen entertainment. As the creator of shows like Popular, Nip/Tuck, Glee,and The New Normal, Murphy has established a distinctive brand of filmmaking that’s faster, louder, and more attention-grabbing than its television contemporaries, and one that puts compelling visuals on par with addictive storylines. Case in point: American Horror Story, Murphy’s television show/miniseries hybrid that plays more like a horror anthology with a new theme each season. In season one it was Murder House, which was followed by Asylum and Coven. And this fall, Freak Show premiered with what Murphy describes as “the most terrifying clown of all time.”

Michael Goi, ASC, ISC has been there since nearly the beginning, shooting the second half of American Horror Story’s first season after first collaborating with Murphy on Glee. “American Horror Story had a visual style and approach for season one that was already established by the time I came on to it,” says Goi. “I didn’t make a lot of alterations to it, but in the last two or three episodes I started to veer in the direction that I felt like the material was taking me, and some of that approach is what’s reflected in season two, Asylum, where you’re dealing with an atmosphere that was very crazed. And I think the camerawork and the lighting reflected that a lot.”

Creating Dreams for Arcade Fire’s “Afterlife”

Scenes from “Afterlife.” (Photo by Emily Kai Block.)

Cinematographer Evan Prosofsky and director Emily Kai Bock talked at length about dreams while in prep for Arcade Fire’s wildly popular music video “Afterlife.”

“We kind of resented the thought that dreams have to be sepia-toned and Gaussian-blurred,” says Prosofsky.