35Mm

Hand of God Shoots Film for a Timeless Feel

Emayatzy Corinealdo and Ron Perlman in "Hand of God". (Credit: Adam Rose/Amazon Studios.)

Amazon Studios’ Hand of God, which stars Ron Perlman as a corrupt, born-again judge who becomes a vigilante, is the latest example of original production by an online streaming entity. Making his television directorial debut, the pilot was directed by Marc Forster (World War Z, The Kite Runner, Finding Neverland) and photographed in a film-noir style by Matthias Koenigswieser. Viewers of the premiere episode were asked to give opinions on Hand of God before the decision to proceed with the series was made, and soon season one, consisting of nine episodes, was moving forward.

The story takes place in a small town in California where an economic bust makes the populace desperate. Joining the production team for the episodes was Rasmus Heise, a member of the Danish Society of Cinematographers whose work has garnered an impressive array of accolades. Helium, his live-action short with director Anders Walter, won an OSCAR® in 2014.

Speech Debelle Filmed At The Royal Court Using 35mm Kodak Stock

Published on website: August 10, 2015
Categories: 35mm , The StoryBoard Blog
Musician Speech Debelle performs live for a filming of her music video Terms and Conditions. Photo by James Cotton.

On Friday 31st July, Mercury Music Award-winning musician Speech Debelle performed her first live show in two years, choosing The Royal Court in London to break her hiatus. Her forthcoming album, Breathe, was performed in its entirety, but there was an extra special twist to the evening, involving Kodak.

Kodak was proud to support director Ed Sayers in shooting a short music video on film as part of the evening. Even the audience were in on the act, instructed to follow a dress code in order to be involved in the filming of Speech Debelle’s new single, Terms and Conditions. The track is off her upcoming album Breathe, which is Speech’s third. As the album isn’t even out until January 2016, this was a treat for fans, and predictably, the event sold out!

Michael Goi on Creating the Freak Show for American Horror Story 

(L-R) Jyoti Amge as Ma Petite, Naomi Grossman as Pepper. CR: Michele K. Short/FX

For the better part of a decade now, Ryan Murphy has been innovating the way audiences look at small screen entertainment. As the creator of shows like Popular, Nip/Tuck, Glee,and The New Normal, Murphy has established a distinctive brand of filmmaking that’s faster, louder, and more attention-grabbing than its television contemporaries, and one that puts compelling visuals on par with addictive storylines. Case in point: American Horror Story, Murphy’s television show/miniseries hybrid that plays more like a horror anthology with a new theme each season. In season one it was Murder House, which was followed by Asylum and Coven. And this fall, Freak Show premiered with what Murphy describes as “the most terrifying clown of all time.”

Michael Goi, ASC, ISC has been there since nearly the beginning, shooting the second half of American Horror Story’s first season after first collaborating with Murphy on Glee. “American Horror Story had a visual style and approach for season one that was already established by the time I came on to it,” says Goi. “I didn’t make a lot of alterations to it, but in the last two or three episodes I started to veer in the direction that I felt like the material was taking me, and some of that approach is what’s reflected in season two, Asylum, where you’re dealing with an atmosphere that was very crazed. And I think the camerawork and the lighting reflected that a lot.”

Creating Dreams for Arcade Fire’s “Afterlife”

Scenes from “Afterlife.” (Photo by Emily Kai Block.)

Cinematographer Evan Prosofsky and director Emily Kai Bock talked at length about dreams while in prep for Arcade Fire’s wildly popular music video “Afterlife.”

“We kind of resented the thought that dreams have to be sepia-toned and Gaussian-blurred,” says Prosofsky.

Three Frames Portray The Grand Budapest Hotel

Published on website: March 07, 2014
Categories: 35mm , Focus On Film , VISION3 500T Color Negative Film 5219/7219
Ed Norton in The Grand Budapest Hotel (Photo By Martin Scali)

Wes Anderson’s string of idiosyncratic, personal films includes Bottle Rocket, Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums, The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, The Darjeeling Limited, Moonrise Kingdom and now, The Grand Budapest Hotel. At the camera for all of these films was Robert Yeoman, ASC, and in each case, they chose to tell their stories on film.

“I’m such a believer in film,” says Yeoman, whose resume also includes Drugstore Cowboy, Dogma, The Squid and the Whale, and Bridesmaids. “I prefer the look and the on-set discipline. I find that when shooting digitally, the camera doesn’t cut, and people’s attention seems to wander. I look around the set and everyone’s on their phones. The process has been polluted. I think film causes people to concentrate on the shot. When the camera is rolling, everyone knows the importance of the moment and is paying attention. This energy is translated onto the film.”