16Mm (Page 2)

Film Rolls on Another Football Season

Published on website: September 05, 2013
Categories: 16mm , Matt Stoffel , Television , The StoryBoard Blog

With more than 45 seasons and more than 100 Emmy® awards under their belts, NFL Films rolls camera on a new season of touchdowns, goal-line stands, and all the other thrilling moments that entrance football fans.

16mm KODAK VISION3 Color Negative Film will be running through their cameras tonight for NFL Films' trademark cinematic shots that put you in the stadium and on the field. They will be shooting 32 and 48 frames per second, and when the game clock runs out the footage will be sent back to One Sabol Way in New Jersey for processing and review. For the seventeen weeks of the regular season and beyond, t

Doc Martin Gets the Super 16 Treatment

Behind the scenes on Doc Martin. (Photos by Rob Ebdon.)

The popular UK television dramedy Doc Martin is back for its sixth season. The show follows a doctor, played by Martin Clunes, who after developing a crippling fear of blood, retrains as a GP. He moves to a quirky seaside town, where he opens a practice and quickly offends the locals with his poor bedside manner.

Doc Martin is filmed on location in the village of Port Isaac in Cornwall, England, where “apparently the sun always shines,” jokes the show’s director of photography Simon Archer, BSC. The cinematographer, who took over for Chris Howard, BSC after season 3, uses a full range of 16mm stocks on the series.

On The Good Road with Super 16

Scene from The Good Road

The Good Road, from director Gyan Correa and cinematographer Amitabha Singh, was recently named the National Award Winner 2013 for Best Feature Film in Gujarati language at the 60th National Film Awards ceremony of the Directorate of Film Festivals. The award honors the best in Indian cinema. The film was produced by NFDC (National Film Development Corporation).

The film is a modern Gujarati story about three sets of people travelling on a highway, cutting through the Banni, bordering the Rann in Kachchh. Each on a journey to achieve their individual pursuits, but over a 24 hour period, the travelers discover something altogether different and unexpected about their lives.

Ephraim’s Rescue: Super 16mm Captures the Heart of a True Story

Scene from Ephraim’s Rescue © Remember Films/used by permission

T.C. Christensen, ASC has made close to 40 feature films and countless shorts and documentaries over the last four decades. The cinematographer-director has been following his passion for filmmaking since high school, when he started shooting with a 16mm Bolex camera, and fostered that ambition with an “opportunity meets preparation” attitude.

Most recently, Christensen finished a labor of love called Ephraim’s Rescue, which tells the true story of Ephraim Hanks, who like most teenage boys, only cares about himself, but finds his way in life, and eventually provides relief and rescue to the suffering Martin Handcart Company pioneers who were caught in Wyoming’s early winter storms in the fall of 1856.

Fruitvale Station: A Tragic Tale Retold Thoughtfully

Published on website: July 10, 2013
Categories: 16mm , Independent Films , Focus On Film , VISION3 500T Color Negative Film 5219/7219
(L-R) MICHAEL B. JORDAN, OCTAVIA SPENCER and Director RYAN COOGLER on the set of FRUITVALE STATION © 2013 The Weinstein Company. All Rights Reserved.

Fruitvale Station entered the 2013 Sundance Film Festival rather quietly, but the small independent film emerged with the Audience Award, the dramatic Grand Jury Prize, and a deal with The Weinstein Company. Written and directed by first-time feature filmmaker Ryan Coogler and based on true events, Fruitvale Station tells the story of 22-year-old Oscar Grant on the final day of 2008 and his untimely death New Year’s Day at the hands of a police officer on the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) station platform in the Fruitvale district of Oakland, California. Grant was unarmed, and the incident caused outrage and inflamed racial tensions.

Handling director of photography duties was Rachel Morrison. Coogler had workshopped Fruitvale Station at the Sundance Institute, and the institute’s Lisa McKinney recommended Morrison to Coogler.